• Posted on December 1, 2016 8:48 am
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    I receive many inquiries from various individuals and organizations with questions regarding Service Dogs, Therapy Dogs and Emotional Support Animals. Below I will explain what each is, what they are for and how they are different from one another. Please keep in mind I am not a lawyer, and that you should consult a lawyer with any specific questions. This article is here for general information purposes only.  What are Service Dogs, Emotional Support Animals and Therapy Dogs? Service Dog - A Service Dog is a dog that was trained to perform specific tasks to help their disabled handler. In other words, a service dog is a highly calibrated piece of medical equipment, or auxiliary aid, that accompanies the handler wherever they go.Emotional Support Animal - An Emotional Support Animal (also known as an "ESA") is an untrained animal (usually dogs or cats) that accompanies their emotionally impaired handler as a form of untrained emotional support. There can be many benefits for the handlers of ESAs, however due to the large number of fraudulent abuse of the system, ESAs are becoming more heavily scrutinized.

  • Posted on December 1, 2016 7:31 am
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    This is a serious problem that needs to be addressed in a realistic manner. Trainers need to take responsibility for techniques they misguide the public with and the subsequent damage they cause.On average, 4,500,000 people are bitten each year. Keep in mind these are reported bites and not the total number of all incidents. That is roughly 12,328 bites a day. Of these bites, 885,000 (over 2,400 a day) require medical attention. Despite kinder, gentler training methods dog bites have not decreased. Roughly 1.5% of the population is affected each year.​Aggression is one of the most misunderstood behaviors, even amongst canine professionals. Roughly 1 out of every 20 dogs I evaluate for aggression is actually aggressive. I apply the frustration-aggression theory (explained below) to work backward from triggers and shape behaviors. By taking control of the situation and being proactive, we can eliminate virtually all frustration and avoid any aggression.This is a serious problem that needs to be addressed in a realistic manner.On average, 4,500,000 people are bitten each year. Keep in mind these are reported bites and not the total number of all

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